HuffPost: Market-Based Approaches Can Help Drive Development and Stability in Nigeria’s Niger Delta

Categories: Featured , IGD Members
Akpobasa Benjamin, a member Catfish Farmers Association of Nigeria (CAFAN) holds catfish from the scale up aquaculture demo fish farm in Ughelli, delta state, Nigeria.

Akpobasa Benjamin, a member Catfish Farmers Association of Nigeria (CAFAN) holds catfish from the scale up aquaculture demo fish farm in Ughelli, delta state, Nigeria.

 

The Niger Delta region in Nigeria is a land full of stark contrasts. The region possesses one of the world’s richest sources of oil, yet more than 70% of its 32 million residents live in poverty. The region produces nearly 75% of Nigeria’s foreign exchange earnings, while its communities still lack access to economic opportunities to create a better life for themselves and their families.

To help encourage peace and stability in the region, Chevron invested $50 million in 2010 to establish the two independent nongovernmental organizations, Nigeria-based Foundation for Partnership Initiatives in the Niger Delta (PIND) and its U.S-based strategic partner, the Niger Delta Partnership Initiative Foundation (NDPI), with the mission of relieving poverty and promoting development across the nine states.

After five years of operation, NDPI and PIND commissioned IGD’s Advisory team to conduct a comprehensive, independent impact assessment of their work in the region. The findings were released in the report,  “Pioneering New Operating Models and Measurement Techniques for Private Sector-Led Development: Assessing Impact in Nigeria’s Niger Delta”.

Dr. Mima S. Nedelcovych, President of the Initiative for Global Development, and Heather Kulp, Executive Director of the Niger Delta Partnership Initiative (NDPI), jointly penned an opinion piece in the Huffington Post outlining how a market-based approach to development can help drive systemic change and economic opportunity in the region.

Read the joint opinion piece on six critical success factors to “move the needle” towards creating systemic change in the Niger Delta.

The NDPI and PIND approach sought to focus on sustainability from the start. By moving away from a grant giving approach that tends to create dependency on donor funding, NDPI and PIND focus on building market systems that catalyze economic opportunities and address the significant barriers to inclusive economic growth, such as conflict and violence, a weak civil society, and poor infrastructure.

To read the opinion piece on Huffington Post, please click here.